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Digital Rights

Under the broader topic "Information society" the BIM currently works on statements and studies on data protection.

Data protection issues have gained in relevance over the last years and are related to several other human rights areas - such as measures taken in combatting trafficking in human beings or data collection about discrimination.

In addition, data protection is part of the Multi-Annual Framework of the European Fundamental Rights Agency, and BIM is involved in ongoing reporting on this topic for the FRA through its participation in the FRALEX network. 

Changing communities, Changing policing - CITYCoP Final Conference

CITYCop Logo

The theories underlying community policing received new impetus with the recent advent of smartphones and social media and especially the notion of user-generated content where the users are citizens engaged in closer interaction with their local community and law enforcement agency. The five years 2010-2014 have seen a rapid upsurge of smartphone apps aimed at improving crime reporting and other forms of UGC and interaction associated with community policing.

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Location: 
Palazzo Vecchio, Piazza della Signoria, Florence

Conference: "Which (international) law applies in Cyberspace?"

On the occasion of the 42nd Austrian Day of International Law 2017, the Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich will hold a conference from 18.05.2017 to 20.05.2017. Conference-topic is: "Which (international) law applies in Cyberspace?" and takes place in the Academy for Political Education in Tutzing.

Dr. Hannes Tretter will give a lecture on "Strategies for dealing with Hate Speech on the Internet" in panel 3 on 19.05.2017.

The german version of the program and the powerpoint presentation of the lecture is attached.

 

Details
Location: 
Akademie für Politische Bildung, Tutzing

HUMAN RIGHTS TALK: Community Policing - people’s police or a policing people?

Human Rights Talk [Logo]

The involvement of the population in police work is a controversial topic. For some, it represents a significant contribution to increasing the sense of security of the inhabitants, an opportunity to make police work more democratic and participatory. Others, however, fear the softening of the state's monopoly of violence, which could promote whistle-blowing and the formation of neighbourhood watches. Which human rights perspectives and considerations are relevant to the implementation of community policing strategies and how can digital solutions promote them?

Details
Location: 
Dachgeschoß Juridicum (Schottenbastei 10-16, 1010 Wien)

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